Museums of Vatican

Museums of Vatican

The modern staircase Bramante serves as an exit from the museum of Pius-Clement. Stairs Bramante called two staircases in the museums of the Vatican. The original staircase was built in 1505, the modern version – in 1932.

Museums of Vatican. Museums were founded by Pope Julius II at the beginning of the 16th century. The route to the Vatican Museums includes the Sistine Chapel with Michelangelo’s ceiling paintings, and the staves decorated by Raphael. In 2013, Vatican Museums were visited by 5.5 million people, which placed them on the fifth place among the most visited museums in the world.

The yard got its name because the site is decorated with a 4-meter gilded bronze cone (pine). It was cast in the І-ІІ century. AD Publish Cincius Salvia, it is listed on its basis. Pine cone is an ancient symbol of the source of life in many cultures, and symbolically represents the pineal gland, which was revered as the “third eye” and the organ responsible for the connection of the human and divine (spiritual) origin. Belvedere’s Nest and bronze Roman fountain in the shape of a cone.
Vatican City, one of the museum’s halls Pio Clementino, dedicated to the famous Greek and Roman works of art (sculpture, mosaic). The Rotunda Hall (Italian Sala Rotonda) was built by Michelangelo Simonetti in 1780 – 1782. in accordance with the ideals of classicism of the XVIII century. In the center of the hall is a huge monolithic porphyry bowl from the Golden House of Emperor Nero. In the niches are installed 18 statues and busts of Roman and Greek gods and heroes. In the center of the picture is a statue of Hercules from gilded bronze (II century, found near the theater of Pompeii), the only gilded statue, preserved from the time of antiquity. The statue was discovered in 1864 near the Pompeii Theater, buried under the slabs, with the inscription “F.C.S.”. (fulgor conditum summanium), indicating that she was struck by lightning and then buried in the square. Paul Rotunda is decorated with a Roman mosaic (III century) from the term Otricoli (in Umbria), depicting the battle of the Greeks with centaurs, newts and Nereids.

Museums of Vatican

The Chiaramonti Museum.

The museum Kyaramonti is one of the museums of the Vatican. The museum dedicated to ancient sculpture was founded by Pope Pius VII from the family of Ciaramonti in 1805-1807. This is a museum of classical sculpture.
The museum has 54 galleries, or a hall, among which the Sistine Chapel is the last.
Museums of the Vatican – a complex of museums located on the territory of the Vatican. Their collections were created by Roman popes and contain works of art by classical masters, including Renaissance works.
The former Roman statue of the River Tiger, restored in the early 16th century by Giovanni Angelo Montorsoli and the marble sarcophagus of 160-170 AD. e., decorated with a relief representing the Battle of the Amazons. The sarcophagus was used in the past as a water basin for the ‘Tiger River’ fountain.
The sculpture depicts the Trojan priest Laocoon and his two sons fighting against snakes. According to the story of the Roman poet Virgil, Laocoon warned the Trojans about the danger of the legendary Trojan Horse, because of which the goddess Athena sent two snakes to kill the priest. The sculpture of the work of the Greek sculptors from Rhodes – Agesandra (author of the famous sculpture “Venus de Milo”) and his sons Afinodor and Polidor, is a marble copy of the second half of the I century BC. e. from the original, which was made in bronze in 200 BC. e. in Pergamum and not preserved.
In the Vatican’s Pinakotheque the works of Italian masters are represented mainly, as well as the collection of Byzantine art acquired by Pope Pius X. In total, the collection presents about 460 paintings from the 12th-19th centuries, placed in 18 halls of the Pinakothek in chronological order. By tradition, the collection contains only paintings on religious topics.

It was customary for the ancient Greeks to call the collection of paintings brought to the goddess Athena as a gift. The ancient Romans used this word to name rooms in which art objects were kept. In the Renaissance, picture collections became known as picture collections accessible to the public.
It was customary for the ancient Greeks to call the collection of paintings brought to the goddess Athena as a gift. The ancient Romans used this word to name rooms in which art objects were kept. In the Renaissance, picture collections became known as picture collections accessible to the public.
The Vatican Pinakothek (a collection of paintings open to the public) was founded by Pope Pius VI in the second half of the 18th century. In 1797, many of the paintings were sent by order of Napoleon Bonaparte to Paris. In 1815, at the Congress of Vienna, it was decided to return the paintings to the Vatican.
The Rotunda Hall was built by Michelangelo in 1780 – 1782. . in accordance with the ideals of classicism. In the center of the hall is a huge monolithic porphyry bowl (13 m in perimeter) from the Golden House of Emperor Nero. In the niches are installed 18 statues and busts of Roman and Greek gods and heroes. In the photo, Hera (Juno), Hercules and Ceres (Demeter) are the goddess of fertility and farming.
Among the exhibits of the museum are basalt and wooden sarcophagi, statues of gods and pharaohs, mummies, papyri, sculptures of the Roman period (II-III centuries), burial urns, and the Book of the Dead. The sarcophagus is a kind of traditional coffin used to bury the nobility and is usually left on the surface of the earth in specially designated rooms or in cemeteries.
Mummy is an embalming body. Mummy is a body (not only human, but also any other living creature), subjected to special chemical treatment, as a result of which the process of decomposition of tissues stops or slows down.
The Gregorian Egyptian Museum is one of the Vatican Museums. The museum was founded in 1839 by Pope Gregory XVI, but the first collection was collected under Pope Pius VII. The museum houses a small collection of Egyptian dynasties from the III millennium, found in Rome and the surrounding area (Villa Adriana in Tivoli), as well as during the Roman occupation of Egypt until the 3rd century AD. e. or purchased in the XIX century from private collections.
The mosaic at the entrance to the hall was found during the excavation of one of the Roman villas where she decorated the triclinium (dining room), and was restored in the 18th century, in the center of the mosaic circle there is an image of Athena, the goddess warrior, clad in a helmet with the sultan and his aegis a kind of cuirass from goatskin, in the center of which, directly on the chest, a medallion with the head of Gorgone (Gorgoneia) was attached. According to the beliefs, its image on the floor of the hall protected the hosts from the influence of evil forces, and at the same time served as an excellent warning for particularly aggressive guests. Around the goddess s phases of the moon. (III century AD)
Hall of the Greek Cross, designed by the architect Simonetti commissioned by Pope Pius VI. It has the appearance of an equilateral Greek cross, which is reflected in the name Zala. The portal portal is guarded by two giant figures of Atlanteans, made in Egyptian style and adorning Hadrian’s villa, the emperor made many trips to eastern possessions and was inspired by the love of the culture of great civilizations.
The ceiling is decorated with images from the life of the apostles, as well as 24 scenes from the Old Testament and landscapes, allegories and arabesques. The gallery is a corridor 120 m long and 6 m wide. It is decorated with 40 geographical maps depicting the former possessions of the Catholic Church and the most important regions of Italy in era of Pope Gregory XIII.
Raphael’s stanitsas are four comparatively small rooms (approximately 9 by 6 m.), Painted in 1508-1517 by Raphael together with the disciples, and a hall whose paintings were painted by the students according to the sketches of the painter after his death.
With great skill, the fresco “The Liberation of Peter” (1513-1514) is depicted telling about the miraculous release of the apostle Peter from the dungeon. The composition is divided into three parts. In the center, the sleeping apostle Peter is depicted behind the bars in a dungeon, over which the angel bends. On the right, the angel takes Peter out of the dungeon, while the guard is asleep, in the left-awake guards, discovering the disappearance of Peter, raise the alarm. Rafael with great skill uses in this fresco night lighting, contributing to the creation of a dramatic mood and deep expressiveness.
The frescoes of Raphael, adorning the walls and ceilings of the stanza, amaze the visitors of the museum complex in the Vatican not only with the skill of execution, harmoniousness and brightness of colors, but also with the plot, details elaboration, profound meaning and symbolism. According to the legend, the Pope himself was so delighted with the work of the young artist that he ordered to knock down already finished images made by other masters from the walls and commissioned all the painting work exclusively for Rafael.
Before we get to the Vatican Museum, we admire the beauty of one of the most famous staircases in the world. It was designed in 1932 by Giuseppe Momo and consists of two spirals – one of which leads up and the other down. A beautiful bronze staircase is decorated with papal emblems.
Pontiff Julius II wished to decorate his home with pictures with spiritual meaning, for which he drew Raphael to work. The master began work in 1508. In order to paint four rooms in turn, the painter and his students took 16 years. Looking at the thoughtfulness and symbolism of the scenes depicted, and how carefully the minute details are worked out, it becomes clear why it took so much time to create a masterpiece. The end of the works Raphael no longer found: in 1520 he died. Finished painting the premises trained by the master.
Four rooms (la stanza with Italian “room”) painted with incredible frescoes by the brush of the genius Raphael, commissioned by Pope Julius II. The history of the masterpiece began with a whim: the newly elected pontiff simply did not want to live in the apartments of his predecessor, Pope Alexander VI Borgia, so he ordered to prepare other rooms for his residence and paint them with new frescoes.

Museums of Vatican