Painting from the Renaissance to the Early 20th Century

Painting from the Renaissance to the Early 20th Century

Silvester Shchedrin Ruins of Ancient Rome. 1824

Painting from the Renaissance to the Early 20th Century

17th CENTURY PAINTING
The range of genres and trends in which the seventeenth century painters elaborated Greek and Roman motifs is very impressive.

The paintings demonstrate the verve and versatility with which the classical heritage was interpreted by the major exponents of the principal European schools, though they invested it with strong national and individual features.
Jan Brueghel, called “Velvet Brueghel” A Bacchanal

Adam Elseheimer Philemon and Baucis

Adam Elseheimer Philemon and Baucis

Nicolas Poussin The Magnanimity of Scipio

Nicolas Poussin The Magnanimity of Scipio

Pierre Narcisse Guerin Aeneas and Dido

Pierre Narcisse Guerin Aeneas and Dido


19th CENTURY PAINTING

In the context of the interpretation of the Greek and Roman imagery, the paintings fall into two periods: in the first thirty-old years of the nineteenth century the creative trend of the European Classicism was still alive, and the artistic idiom still rang with the echoes of antiquity; later, the Greek and Roman subjects became merely the empty attributes of academic routine or simply provided the incidents for “entertaining” pieces on themes from ancient history.

Pierre Mignard Portrait of Duchesse de la Valliere as Flora

Pierre Mignard Portrait of Duchesse de la Valliere as Flora

Karl Friedrich Schinkel Ideal Landscape with Resting Shepherds. 1823

Karl Friedrich Schinkel Ideal Landscape with Resting Shepherds. 1823

EARLY 20th CENTURY PAINTING
At the turn of nineteenth and twentieth centuries the notion of classical antiquity as something consummate and harmoniously integral, which has stood firm from the Renaissance to the late nineteenth century, was subjected to a radical revision. In the history of European art the years between 1905 and 1925 were marked by an anti-classical trend and by a preoccupation with archaism (interpreting mythological images through archaizing), with the accent on its barbarous, spontaneous, elemental aspects. The antique heritage as a norm and all-time model was depreciated and downgraded; it was now interpreted in a totally different way. The twentieth century artists were looking for a circuitous, mediate appoach to classical antiquity, and this gave rise to diverse and often fascinating artistic solutions.

Jean Lemaire Imaginary View of a Piazza in Ancient Rome

Jean Lemaire Imaginary View of a Piazza in Ancient Rome

Konstantin Bogayevsky A Classical Landscape. 1910

Konstantin Bogayevsky A Classical Landscape. 1910

Valentin Serov Odysseus and Nausicaa. 1910

Valentin Serov Odysseus and Nausicaa. 1910